• Paris Fashion Week F/W ’19 Accessory Trend Spotlight

    0 comments / Posted by Paige McKirahan

    Paris Fashion Week F/W ’19 Accessory Trend Spotlight

    By Paige McKirahan 

     

    Some tend to say that the best is saved for last, and this fashion month this statement may have held true when Paris Fashion Week closed our couture-filled thirty days of fun. PFW, which ran from February 25 and March 5th, is one of the longest running international fashion weeks that is commonly crowed the chicest of the bunch. As the original fashion capital of the world, the expectations in Paris were high but fortunately, the couture was higher. Gucci, Burberry, and Chanel are just a few of the high-profile names that stunned crowds as Karl Lagerfeld’s heavenly final designs made their way down the runway draping his various muses including Cara Delevingne and Penelope Cruz.

     

    Models walk the runway during the Chanel show featuring Karl Lagerfeld's final collection.Final walk, Chanel F/W 2019 (source)

    As we have come to realize this fashion month, high-profile headwear is at the helm of fall’s trendiest accessories in London, Milan, New York, and now Paris. Loewe nodded to classic constructions when they created their helmet style headwear featuring fin-like protrusions both above the ears and on the top of the design. Dior took note of Tom Ford’s NYFW bucket hat revival, spinning the desire to feature animal print complete with netting around the bill. We saw structured hats add inches to feet in height from Chanel, Ann Demeulemeester, and Nina Ricci that stunned with their glamorous color palettes. We also saw a boom in the hair accessory world with barrettes and headbands once again taking reign; Balmain hit the nail on the head with their chain link headband made complete a chic aesthetic to die for.

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    From top: Loewe, Nina Ricci, and Balmain (source)

    Eyewear took on classic silhouettes with large lenses officially taking the frame-style crown back from last season’s tiny specks. Stella McCartney and Loewe’s designs had an intergalactic flair, while Celine and Chloe exhibited their love for vintage trends with their ‘70s inspired looks.

     

    Stella McCartney

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    From top: Loewe and Chloe (source)

    The jewelry displayed in Paris may be the most visually enthralling of all work throughout fashion month; their various structures and use of art styles directly in their designs stole the spotlight when they stepped onto the runway. We saw Isabel Marant take their shot at the single earring trend, creating a silver cuff with a whimsical aesthetic. Givenchy took the classic dangling earring style and implemented it into their ring designs, with tassels falling from a ring-bracelet hybrid. PFW gave us great stacking looks with everything from earrings to bangles as labels like Alexander McQueen loaded up their models with accessories that proved too much may never be enough. Lastly, the Y/Project may have had the most startling jewelry designs of all collections; with metal spirals to Greek-like sculptures incorporated into their work, they established their designs as artwork in their own right.

     

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    From top: Givenchy, Isabel Marant, and Y/Project (source)

    Statement bags and belts also dominated the runway this fashion month, especially in this industry capital. In terms of silhouettes, it seems that thick, waist belts will be the “it” style this coming fall; both Chloe and Isabel Marant took this oversized look and combined it with last season western appeal to create beautiful, contemporary pieces perfect for cold weather looks. Off-White got in on the Parisian belt action with their classic clean-line design finished off with text saying “Off-White ‘LOGO’” replacing the traditional buckle. Givenchy combined the idea of the “it” belt and bag into a simple, utilitarian design perfect for those fashionistas on the go.

     

    Isabel Marant

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    Givenchy

    From top: Chloe, Off-White, and Givenchy (source)

    As we have now seen on runways around the globe, the idea of what is "in" when it comes to handbags is shifting. This runway season, the ornamental styles of SS ’19 are out, and small-scale silhouettes are in.  From casual totes to wallet style designs, all collections had something stunning to offer. Rochas and Altuzarra created cinched bucket bags that are sure to be on everyone's must-have list. Givenchy and Stella McCartney took on an iPhone sized contemporary approach, while other brands like Chanel reinvented the fanny pack. One of the most talked about bags of the week, though, could barely hold your pocket change; these micro bags from Jacquemus have been making headlines from the moment they made their way into Paris!

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    From top: Givenchy, Chanel, and Jacquemas  (source)

    With this, we now conclude the coverage of our favorite month in fashion! Which week was your favorite? We loved the looks in London and Paris! Check out our coverage of New York, London, and Milan and be sure to stay tuned for more fun fashion finds for this upcoming spring season!

    Sources:

    Carreon, J. (2019, March 06). From Chanel Barrettes to Saint Laurent Fedoras, These Are Paris's Best Accessories. Retrieved from https://www.elle.com/fashion/g26679692/paris-fashion-week-fall-winter-2019-accessories-jewelry-hats-sunglasses/?slide=19
    Carreon, J. (2019, March 06). See the Hottest Bags Making Their Debut at Paris Fashion Week. Retrieved from https://www.elle.com/fashion/g26679666/bags-paris-fashion-week-fall-2019/?slide=47
    Wallace, F. (2019, March 05). The Best Accessories From Paris Fashion Week. Retrieved from https://www.instylemag.com.au/accessories-paris-fashion-week-fall-2019

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  • Milan Fashion Week F/W ’19 Accessory Trend Spotlight

    0 comments / Posted by Paige McKirahan

    Milan Fashion Week F/W ’19 Accessory Trend Spotlight

    By Paige McKirahan

     

    As we have now concluded our catwalk through the third week of our favorite month in fashion, Milan emphatically reinforced its stance as one of the top fashion capitals in the world with its out-of-the-box shows. Milan Fashion Week, running from February 19th to the 25th, boasted its largest season to date as 179 collections were on display in this Italian favorite, closing out the month of February. Serving as the birthplace for some of the industry’s favorite family-run fashion houses (think Prada, Missoni, and Fendi), there is no doubt that this dynasty-driven capital has no problem putting the haute in couture. In the wake of Karl Lagerfeld’s death, expectations were high and undoubtedly were met with collections like Moncler taking up entire street corners and Moschino’s homage to Price is Right!

     

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    Moschino's Price is Right set (source)

    Eclectic headwear has truly established itself as one of this season's "it" accessory as classic winter styles with a twist have been seen in collections in New York, London, and now Milan. Anteprima, United Colors of Benetton, and Fendi all presented their own variations of the Russian-style cold weather favorite complete with fur and chinstraps. Armani took a less utilitarian approach to headgear as their jewel-encrusted berets paired with their rigid silhouettes proved to be the perfect touch of femininity. Agnona's approach headwear was purely functional as their simple, beige beanies were the perfect companion to their monochromatic looks.

     

    United Colours Of Benetton - Runway: Milan Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2019/20

    Emporio Armani - Runway: Milan Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2019/20

    From top: United Colors of Benetton, Armani, and Agnona (source)

    Moving on to eyewear, Milan boasted pieces that were far from conventional. Gucci threw their own private masquerade with a horror-themed- twist as models made their way down the runway with face and eye coverings embellished with long spikes. Looking towards a more traditional approach, Fendi, Armani, and Prada are here to prove that the age of tiny sunglasses is out and oversized frames are back in. One new variation that looks like its still here to stay? Sunglasses lenses in bright hues!

     

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    Fendi - Runway: Milan Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2019/20

    From top: Gucci, Prada, and Fendi (source)

    Switching the conversation to jewelry, it is evident that gold is now reigning as the primary material for this coming cold weather season. Donatella Versace made this evident in her Milan collection, with gold belts, earrings, and necklaces designed with a mix of delicate and chunky constructions. Vivetta and Fausto Puglisi took hold of the single earring trend that was popular in the S/S '19 shows last year and showed that this style is here to stay all throughout 2019. Marni's jewels included a variety of chain-like motifs in the chokers seen throughout their collection worked beautifully when paired with their vibrant punk-meets-conference room aesthetic. Moschino stunned with jewel-encrusted costume jewelry perfect for their Price is Right set, with gold and silver settings pairing seamlessly with Jeremy Scott's over-the-top clothing designs.

     

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    From top: Versace, Vivetta, Marni, and Moschino (source)

    Looking to bags, this season the universal design theme leaned toward compact and handheld. As we saw last week in London, the idea of the "it" bag is transforming, and designers may still be trying to adapt to this accessory based shift. Nevertheless, we loved this season's affinity for miniature handbags perfect for a phone and wallet but not much else, forcing their carriers into decluttering. Check out some of our favorites below! 

     

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    From top: Bottega Veneta, Vivetta, Moschino, and Tod's (source)

    Now that this season's fashion month is almost over, have your favorite collections been in London, New York, or Milan? So far, we loved the wild look of London, but we can't choose just one as our favorite until we see what Paris has to offer!

    Keep this article on hand for some great fashion inspiration for the next cold weather season, and shop our collections for some great headwearpinsbangles, and dangling earrings of your own! For more FW coverage, be sure to stay tuned next week for our look at all things Paris!

     

    Sources:

    Person. (2019, February 27). All of the Accessories and Jewelry You're Going to Want From Milan Fashion Week. Retrieved from https://www.elle.com/fashion/trend-reports/g26432796/milan-fashion-week-fall-winter-2019-accessories-jewelry-trends/?slide=1
    Carreon, Justine. (2019, February 26). The Best Looks From Milan Fashion Week Fall 2019. Retrieved from https://www.elle.com/fashion/trend-reports/g26516529/best-looks-milan-fashion-week-fall-2019/?slide=55

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  • London Fashion Week F/W 19 Accessory Trend Spotlight

    0 comments / Posted by Paige McKirahan

    London Fashion Week F/W 19 Accessory Trend Spotlight

    By Paige McKirahan 

     

    Now that we are on the second week of fashion’s favorite month, we are truly beginning to see this year’s cold weather trends take form on runways all around the globe. Since February 15th, we have been watching one of the most eclectic and high-profile fashion week’s take place in London; this capital’s collections have just as enthralling as those seen in New York, with bold colors schemes and larger than life accessories taking center stage. As the location for Karl Lagerfeld’s final show for Fendi, it was only customary that London brought the heat despite the cold, dreary weather. From controversy’s surrounding Burberry’s accessories to political statements made by Vivienne Westwood, there is a lot to discuss from this avant-garde week in the Big Smoke.

     

    Vivienne Westwood Homo Loquax climate change fashion show A/W 2019

    Vivienne Westwood’s show (source)

     

    Taking cues from New York, collections in London spared no expense when it came to headgear designs. From cowhide berets by House of Holland to oversized earmuffs by Ryan Lo, it is evident that fall 2019 will bring looks that stun from the top of your head to the tips of your toes. Barrets and hairpins covered in pearls or gems wowed in Ashish’s collection when paired with their galactic makeup aesthetics and heightening hairstyles. Ear wraps made an eye-catching runway appearance when Ashley Williams paired her collection's colorful tights with a headwrap that featured motifs that you will have to see to believe (look below!!). We also saw function paired with fashion in Matty Boven’s headpieces, with his over-the-top, Yorkshire inspired earmuffs being the perfect avant-garde accessory for braving the bitter UK cold. Quite possibly the tamest and utilitarian piece of the bunch was created by Molly Goddard; moving away from the traditional earmuff’s and toboggans, she created a knit headscarf that protects you AND your hair from the less-than-desirable winter weather.

     

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    From top: House of Holland, Ashish, and Ashley Williams (source)

    London collections took cues from your grandmother's closet when they incorporated brooches into looks with aesthetics ranging from abstract to western. Burberry took a step in a positive direction when creative director Ricardo Tisci accessorized his autumnal collection with sculptural pins that emulated shapes found on the beach. Toga's take on the brooch was a little less flirtatious as their bull horn pins made us feel like we were out of London and into Houston.

     

     

    From top: Burberry, Toga (source)

    Oversized, stackable jewelry prevailed in London just as it did in New York; from chunky gold neckwear by J.W. Anderson to bedazzled chokers spanning from collarbone to chin by Halpern, collections across the pond made a simple statement: dainty is out and chunky is in. We also saw a variety of details incorporated into jewelry designs, like the delicate pins featured in necklaces by Molly Goddard and feathers trailing on the ends of dangling earrings by Roksanda and Ports 1961.

     

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    From top: Halpern, Molly Goddard, and Ports 1961 (source)

    Unlike New York, London boasted collections full of statement belts that were big, boisterous, and waist-cinching in style. This fun-but-functional accessory stole the show in Alexa Chung's collection with her thick, animal print belts complimenting her denim pieces to perfection. Toga's belts turned up the heat and the zoom when their larger-than-life belts were the centerpieces of their collection; this oversized piece with double buckles paired well with their thick gloves and layered fabric silhouettes.

     

    From top: Alexa Chung, Toga (source)

    Last but definitely not least, this season's Fashion Weeks are showing us that the idea of the "it" bag is slowly changing into a new concept entirely. Jolin Wu is a pioneer of this movement with their luxe drawstring bags that emulate ones you would see in a school locker room. Covered in fur and clutched to the chest, these were anything but elementary while still having a nostalgia-inducing style.

     

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    Out of all of the fabulous accessories seen walking down the runways this week, which were your favorites? We love the resurgence of the statement belt, and have plenty in our collections for those ready to hop on the trend early! 

    Keep this article on hand for some great fashion inspiration for the next cold weather season, and shop our collections for some great headwearpinsbangles, and dangling earrings of your own! For more FW coverage, be sure to stay tuned next week for our look at all things Milan!

    Sources:

    Monday, F. 1. (2019, February 18). Brooches, berets and all the best accessories at London Fashion Week. Retrieved from https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/lifestyle/fashionandbeauty/brooches-berets-and-all-the-best-accessories-at-london-fashion-week-905248.html
    Person. (2019, February 19). The Cutest Barrettes, Hats, and Other Accessories from London Fashion Week. Retrieved from https://www.elle.com/fashion/trend-reports/g26406516/jewelry-accessories-london-fashion-week-fall-2019/

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  • Fashion and Travels: English Hat Heaven

    0 comments / Posted by Paige McKirahan

    Fashion and Travels: English Hat Heaven

    By Paige McKirahan 

     

    All over the world, hats have seen their popularity and overall style fluctuate with market and consumer interest. One country that seems to be still be at the helm of the headwear frenzy after years of iconic hat moments is the United Kingdom. From the bowler to the fascinator, the British infatuation with all things hats has traditional roots that date back centuries. As a nation of self-proclaimed hat wearers, the accessory has been pivotal in defining class, gender, and occupation throughout for centuries. Long have they been associated with symbolic meaning, hats have seen a resurgence of popularity after the most recent Royal weddings have placed a spotlight back on millinery in a big way. 

    The flat cap, which is one of England’s most iconic styles, can be traced all the way back to medieval times and became a subject of Tudor laws. An act of Parliament was even instituted stating that all males over the age of six had to wear a wool cap on Sundays and holidays; this became a requirement in 1571 and there was even a fine in place if they did not comply! The flat cap then became an icon of working class culture in the following centuries and prompted the birth of the bowler. Conceived in the Victorian Age, this style was a staple in the closet of the businessman after its practical construction quickly caught the eye of the public. There are many iconic wearers of this style like Liza Minelli and John Steed, but no one immortalized the bowler quite like Charlie Chaplin did when he made it a part of his famous ensemble!

     

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    Charlie Chaplin in a bowler (source)

     

    The deerstalker is another essential British hat design that was made most popular by Sherlock Holmes. As the cornerstone of a Victorian gentleman’s hunting attire, this hat was not created for daily wear in the city and moving towards the Edwardian era, we saw millinery become widely prevalent in hat making. Designs became more elaborate and commonly featured decorative items like lace, birds, flowers, bows, and artificial fruits. Their grand design required the use of hatpins in order to secure their stance on the head, and they allowed women to sport their fabulous headwear even when they were out campaigning for women’s right to vote!

    Moving into the 1940s, we saw the rise of the headscarf turban hat as women needed them to ensure their long hair would not get caught in machinery while working in factories. This turban style was a symbol of the war effort and lead to hats becoming an essential piece in the resurgence of Parisian haute couture. Though it seemed that hats would remain a classic accessory at this time, the rise of car ownership in the 1960s denounced the need for lavish headwear or utilitarian hats as they were no longer needed for weather protection or class demarcations.

     

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    A turban hat in action (source)

     

    In the past decade, this British love for hat wearing has been revived with a new generation of Royals. Royal headgear has always been a staple in English culture, and thanks to the wedding of Prince William and Duchess Kate paired with the 300th anniversary of the Ascot races, the hat’s classic status has been restored. Rachel Trevor-Morgan, who has been milliner to the Queen since 2006, has created hats for a multitude of royal events including The Queen’s 80th birthday Service of Thanksgiving at St. Pauls and her Diamond Wedding Celebration. This amazing designer credits the Duchess of Cambridge to be a pioneer in hat wearing that will inspire wearers for years to come. Since her wedding, the Stockport Hat Works Museum, which is the only of its kind in the country, is peaking in popularity with their attendee’s headwear use even steadily increasing.

    One hat-maker seeing great success is Piers Atkinson; his background working with Zandra Rhodes formed his eccentric style that can be seen on the pages of pivotal publications ranging from Italian Vogue to Tatler. His kitschy, eye-catching designs have been seen on the heads of Kate Moss and Dame Shirley Bassey, establishing himself as a classic contemporary designer with traditional techniques to match. Fred Butler is also seeing similar popularity with her hand-crafted pieces; as the granddaughter of a milliner, she has hat making in her genes and her skilled techniques are loved by the likes of Bjork and Lady Gaga. Hats off to Britain for having such a rich hat history, and we can’t wait to see how their style evolves over the next century!

     

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    Piers Atkinson Design (source)

    Sources:

    Magazine, B. (2013, June 17). History of hats. Retrieved from http://www.britain-magazine.com/features/history-of-hats/

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  • Fashion Flashback: The Hot History of Hats

    0 comments / Posted by Paige McKirahan

    Fashion Flashback: The Hot History of Hats

    By Paige McKirahan

     

    To continue on with our historical evaluation behind some of the most iconic accessories of all time, it would only be appropriate to reflect on how hats came to be in celebration of Hat Day!  Whether they be worn for fashion, protection, ceremonies, rituals, or utilitarian purposes, these head coverings have been a staple in the industry for thousands of years. Of course, this long history starts in ancient Egypt; one of the first images depicting a hat can be found in Thebes tomb and this illustration shows a man wearing a conical straw hat. They also first appeared in an early illustration of Pileus which depicted him wearing a simple small cap.

     

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    Ancient Egyptian Headwear (source)

     

    In this time and throughout history, one of the most popular materials for hats is felt. The ancient Egyptians and Native Americans first discovered this material when they discovered that camel hair, when compacted into the floors of their sandals, contributes to the creation of this material. St. Clement, the patron saint of felt hat makers, was said to encounter the material in a similar fashion after filling his shoes with flax fibers.

    In these ancient times, hats were generally worn either to signify high status or for protection from the elements. In Ancient Rome and Greece, Phrygian caps also referred to as Liberty caps, were used as symbols of freedom for exonerated slaves. The first brimmed caps were found in Ancient Greece and were worn by those seeking to protect themselves from the sun, typically those working in fields or in construction.

    As headwear began to evolve, gendered styles came into play during the Middle Ages; women were wearing a variety of new head covering designs ranging from veils to wimples. Later in those years, women’s hats transformed into elaborate displays of wealth that sometimes featured two horn-like decorations or conical shapes.

     

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    Middle Ages Hat Styles (source

    The 18th century birthed newer designs created by milliners; the term was created to describe products made in Milan and other Northern Italian regions that were made with high-quality materials. One of the most popular hats of this time was the Shepherdess hat, which featured a large, sun-blocking brim. Bonnets were as popular women’s in fashion as top hats were for men, and both were made from silk at the time. Silk top hats were so popular and awe-inspiring that a man wearing once caused such a stir in the streets he earned himself a 500 dollar fine from inciting panic!

    In the following century, hat’s widespread popularity began to rise and was considered to be very fashionable as more designs become available. Women’s hats started growing in size and opulence with many including feather details, circular constructions, and varying brim styles. Brim sizes saw a decrease with the introduction of the parasol umbrella, and then grew again as the 20th century grew closer. Hats also began adapting to popular hairstyles, accommodating new cuts and fashions as to not disturb one's overall look. The first Kentucky Derby occurred in this century and established itself as the largest hat fashion event in America (and it still is to this day!).

     

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    Kentucky Derby Fashion

     

    The 20th century saw hats in a new light entirely. Wars, constant rationing, and accompanying social and cultural changes had a huge impact on all aspects of fashion, including headwear. The cloche hat peaked in popularity, and round hats with decorative flowers were another favorite of fashion lovers everywhere. Towards the middle of the century, fashion icons like Jackie Kennedy popularized the pillbox hat, which was followed by the fedora for both genders. Berets, top hats, sombreros, western hats, and ball caps all fluctuated in popularity during this time, and some of these styles are still very well received by the public.

    Today, hats are still a hugely popular accessory and have been made staples in many sporting, cultural, and social events. They aren’t typically worn for ornamental purposes with as much gusto as they once were, but sports caps, beanies, and sun hats are beloved accessories for casual wear in modern times. To get a piece of fashion history to have as your own, check our collection of hats 

     

    Happy Hat Day TalkingFashion Peeps!

     

    Sonni California Vintage Hat Millinery Accessories

     

    Sources:

    A Brief History of Hats. (2011). Retrieved from http://hatbox.com/hat-history.cfm
    History and Origin of Hats. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.historyofhats.net/hat-history/who-invented-hats/

     

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